University is Communication

University Communications

University Communications organizes the central communication activities of the University of Bonn and is responsible for maintaining and developing its communication channels. We help to establish good, successful communications between members of the University, the media and the public, thereby assisting the University in fulfilling its important research and teaching responsibilities. 

Our Services

A stack of newspapers can be seen.
© Colourbox.de

Press Service

Not a day goes by without something new at the University. New knowledge is created every day by researchers at the University of Bonn. From Hofgarten to Venusberg, we provide the news faster than anyone else.

Publications

The University magazine, brochures and reports—the University of Bonn creates its own publications to provide information about its work.

Online Editing

The thousands of central webpages at the University of Bonn need constant editing to keep them up-to-date. We do that!

Social Media

We use social media to keep in contact with our fans and friends in Bonn and around the world

Corporate Design

Our corporate design ensures high recognition of the “University of Bonn” brand. We can help you use it.

Video and Photo Service

We put research and teaching in the proper light. We use photos and videos to present the University of Bonn and its members.

forsch. The University Magazine

What moves the University of Bonn? Who are the people behind the research results and programs offered? Read about it here!

Eight colorful dial telephones stand in a cabinet.
© Colourbox.de

Team

Our team will advise you on all matters relating to communications, press relations and public relations. 

Latest News
Euclid delivers first scientific results

Today, the Euclid Consortium publishes the first scientific publications on observations with the Euclid space telescope. In a first early observation phase, some scientifically spectacular results have already been achieved. These give a glimpse of the unprecedented capabilities of the telescope, which is expected to produce over the next few years one of the most accurate maps of the evolution of our Universe. All fifteen publications will be available on the arXiv preprint server from tomorrow on. Once the peer review process is complete, they will also appear in a special issue of the journal “Astronomy & Astrophysics.”

Podcast: How museums are still perpetuating colonialist notions today. With Dr. Julia Binter

Junior Professor Dr Julia Binter investigates cooperative research on cultural assets from colonial contexts in museums. She accompanies the restitution of cultural assets from Germany to Namibia with the question: How can knowledge creation in museums and cultural heritage be made more sustainable and fair? German colonial history still characterises our understanding of Namibian art today. The returned cultural artefacts tell their own story.
We also spoke to an expert from Namibia, Golda Ha-Eiros, who impressively explains the value of these cultural artefacts for her ancestors, for herself and for the next generation.

Roots are a key to drought-tolerant maize

Maize can grow successfully in very different local conditions. An international study headed by the University of Bonn has now demonstrated the important role of the plant root system. The researchers analyzed more than 9,000 varieties in the study and were able to show that their roots varied considerably – depending on how dry the location is where each variety was cultivated. They were also able to identify an important gene that plays a role in the plant’s ability to adapt. This gene could be the key to developing varieties of maize that cope better with climate change. The results were recently published in the prestigious journal Nature Genetics.

Can oxytocin help against loneliness?

Loneliness is not a disease. And yet it is a significant health problem. Depression, heart disease or dementia - people who are permanently lonely have a higher risk of becoming ill. The team led by Dr. Jana Lieberz from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB), who also conducts research at the University of Bonn, and Prof. Dr. Dirk Scheele (Ruhr University Bochum) have investigated how loneliness can be specifically combated. In a controlled study, in which the universities of Oldenburg, Bochum, Freiburg and Haifa (Israel) were also involved, 78 women and men who felt lonely were given the so-called "cuddle hormone" oxytocin as a nasal spray. The effects that the researchers observed could help to alleviate loneliness and its potentially serious consequences in the future. 

Wird geladen