DFG funded consortia

DFG Collaborative Research Projects at the University of Bonn

The German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) is one of the largest third-party funding organizations of the University of Bonn. The research consortia listed here, such as Collaborative Research Centers (SFB) / Transregios (TRR), Research Training Groups (GRK), Research Groups (FOR) and Priority Programs (SPP) play an important role. Cooperation in these collaborative research projetcs strengthens the transdisciplinary profile areas of the university. 

SFB / TRR

Collaborative Research Centers (SFB) are long-term research associations of up to twelve years in which researchers work together within the framework of an interdisciplinary research program.

By coordinating and pooling mind and resources at the applicant university or universties SFBs enable innovative, demanding, complex and long-term research projects. In this way, they serve to create institutional priorities and structures, interdisciplinary cooperation, the promotion of young researchers, and equal opportunities. Cooperation with non-university research institutions is expressly encouraged.

Eine Wissenschaftlerin und ein Wissenschaftler arbeiten hinter einer Glasfassade und mischen Chemikalien mit Großgeräten.
© colourbox

Collaborative Research Centers (SFB) at the University of Bonn

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Kusche
Institut für Geodäsie und Geoinformation
Nußallee 17
53115 Bonn

Summary

Several continental regions on Earth are getting wetter, while others are literally ‘drying out’, not only in terms of precipitation but also measured by the increase or decrease in surface water, water stored in soils and plant root zones, and groundwater. As seen in terrestrial, space-geodetic and remote sensing data, drying and wetting are generally attributed to the combined effects of global warming from greenhouse gas forcing, natural variability, and anthropogenic modification of the water cycle. However, existing climate models that account for these effects cannot adequately explain the observed patterns of hydrological change. Contrary to common belief, observations also do not support a simple dry-gets-dryer and wet-gets-wetter logic. Instead, the observed trends in, e.g. precipitation, soil moisture, water storage, or flood discharge, deviate considerably from such a simplified logic. The proposed CRC aims to close this gap in understanding. To better comprehend the origin of these patterns, it is necessary to build a modelling framework that explains past observations as realistically as possible, accounts for potential drivers of change that may have been understudied in the past, and can predict future changes. This CRC will rely on a sophisticated modelling approach fueled by a broad range of disciplines with a particular focus on anthropogenic relations.
Climate change and anthropogenic interactions are already affecting the frequency of extreme events such as heatwaves, droughts and floods. For example, more intense, frequent, and prolonged heatwaves are projected for the 21st century; surface- and groundwater buffer the effects of such heatwaves, but large-scale drying may exacerbate them to an as yet unknown extent. Societal, environmental, and economic consequences include increased risk in agricultural production, threats to agricultural productivity and food security and increasing health risks. This CRC proposes to test the hypothesis that humans – through decades of land-use change and intensified water use and management – have caused persistent modifications in the coupled water and energy cycles of land and atmosphere. Compared to green-house gas (GHG) forcing and natural variability, these human-induced changes contribute considerably to the observed trends in water storage at the regional scale. It is hypothesized that – next to known local effects – human land management, land and water use changes have altered the regional atmospheric circulation and related water transports. These changes in the weather balance’s spatial patterns have, it is hypothesized, created and amplified imbalances that lead to excessive drying or wetting in more remote regions. This hypothesis shall be tested for a single region of continental size in the 1st phase (Europe/Eurasia). Evidence-based sustainability criteria for land and water use activities shall be developped.
To address these objectives, hydrologists, meteorologists, land-use modellers, geodesists, data assimilation and remote sensing specialists, data scientists, agricultural economists, and social scientists will collaborate closely in four clusters. These clusters will (A) improve the representation of physical processes and processes that drive land use, (B) improve the climate data record with geodetic and remote sensing techniques, (C) establish a central modelling system including the data assim-ilation framework, and (D) structure diagnostics to test the CRC’s central hypothesis.

Participating Institutions

  • Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH
  • Deutsche Wetterdienst DWD
  • Universität zu Köln
  • Georg-August-Universität Göttingen


Term

01.01.2022 - 31.12.2025 (1. Funding Period)

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Eicke Latz
Institut für Angeborene Immunität
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Summary

Evolutionary constraints have selected humans for sensitive and effective anti-microbial immune responses, energy efficiency and storage, and elevation of blood glucose levels during inactivity or infection. These traits provided increased fitness in times in which constant pathogenic threats and periods of starvation were common. The human environment in the developed world, however, has drastically changed. While infectious triggers of the immune system have diminished, non-infectious immune and metabolic triggers from Western-type diets, man-made bioactive substances, pollution, or smoking, now pose a significant risk to human health. The overabundance of food paired with sedentary behaviours has, furthermore, led to an unprecedented increase in positive energy balance. Therefore, the evolutionarily favoured immune and metabolic adaptations have become a liability for modern humans. Immunometabolic diseases, including obesity, type II diabetes, cancer, asthma, and neurodegeneration, are on the rise, and some of these diseases have reached epidemic proportions. Research in the last decades has revealed that the immune and metabolic systems respond to a modern lifestyle with chronic, low-grade inflammation, which is called metaflammation, and is causally linked to the development of many non-communicable diseases (NCD).The CRC brings together the transdisciplinary expertise from three faculties of the University of Bonn (Medicine, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, and Philosophy), the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, the Max-Planck-Institute for Metabolism Research in Cologne, and the Braunschweig Integrated Centre of Systems Biology to collaboratively address the unmet need to understand the mechanisms leading to metaflammation and to translate these findings into novel therapeutic and preventative strategies. The CRC aims to i. study how the triggers associated with a Western lifestyle lead to immune cell programming and cause metaflammation, ii. investigate the crosstalk between reprogrammed immune cells and the inflamed tissues, iii. address the role of specific pathways activated in metaflammation for disease pathogenesis, iv. perform bi-directional translational research between murine and human studies by investigating the discovered mechanisms in patient populations as well as in the longitudinal population ‘Rhineland Study’. A particular strength of the CRC is a systems immunology approach that uses unbiased multi-omics investigations combined with sophisticated bioinformatics analyses to decipher the causes and consequences of metaflammation. This work will provide a more holistic understanding of how metaflammation and cellular programming trigger the development of organ pathology and dysfunction and will reveal new targets for pharmacological intervention and generate the necessary evidence to foster the initiation of effective preventative strategies.

Participating Institutions

  • DZNE, Bonn
  • Max Planck Institut für Stoffwechselforschung, Köln
  • Technische Universität Braunschweig

Term

01.01.2021 - 31.12.2024 (1. Funding Period)

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Heinz Beck
Laboratory for Experimental Epileptology and Cognition Research
Department of Epileptology
Life & Brain Center
Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25
53127 Bonn

Summary

The overarching goal of the CRC is to understand how behavior is generated by coordinated activity of neuronal circuits, and how this is disrupted in neurological disorders. The past decade has seen significant advances in this field, with the refinement of techniques for measuring and manipulating the activity of large populations of neurons in behaving animals, as well as the ability to quantify behavior in novel, extremely precise ways. This has allowed to formulate and test new hypotheses about how neuronal activity represents features of the outside world, how neuronal circuits integrate environmental information with internal states, and how this leads to goal-directed behavior.Notably, even simple behaviors rely on the orchestrated performance of neuronal circuits spanning multiple brain regions. The CRC will, therefore, leverage the critical mass of projects designed to investigate different brain areas for the examination of extended neuronal systems spanning multiple brain regions. We will focus on how these systems work together and how neuromodulation, which we consider to be a key factor in mediating state-dependent modulation in multiple brain regions, contributes to behaviorally relevant circuit activity. These approaches lead to the acquisition of rich behavioral and cellular data, which have to be integrated into a theoretical framework that allows us to rigorously link behavior to neuronal activity patterns. The CRC will mount a coordinated effort to develop methods for the precise observation of behavior and identification of behavioral syntax. Moreover, both within individual projects and within the central project, the CRC will implement a range of mathematical and theoretical methods that link neuronal activity to behavioral features. Finally, the CRC will use novel behavioral opto-tagging and imaging approaches combined with transcriptomic/connectomic approaches to obtain more precise, cellular, and synapse-level connectivity data from neurons identified as behavior-related in vivo.We will continue to apply these interdisciplinary approaches to the study of CNS disorders, most notably epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease. We are convinced that understanding the basis of disease-related phenotypes across scales, down to the level of single neurons, is crucial to gaining a true understanding of neurological diseases and developing novel treatments.

Participating Institutions:

  • Forschungszentrum Caesar, Bonn
  • Deutsche Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen (DZNE), Bonn
  • Weizmann-Institut für Wissenschaften, Israel
  • Universität zu Köln 

Term
01.10.2013 - 30.06.2025 (3. Funding Period)

Website23333222

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Stefan Müller
Institut für Angewandte Mathematik
Endenicher Allee 60
53115 Bonn

Summary

The central aim of the Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) is to understand the emergence of new effects at larger scales from the interaction of many units at a smaller scale. The CRC will develop new rigorous mathematical concepts and tools to address this phenomenon and sharpen and test these tools in specific situations. The CRC focuses on three interrelated themes, which are reflected by the following Project Groups:

A. From quantum mechanics to condensed matter and materials science
B. Stochastic systems and continuum limits
C. Geometric structures and high dimensional problems

Participating Institution:

  • Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Term
01.01.2013 - 31.12.2024

Website344433

SFB/Transregios at the University of Bonn

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. med. Alexander Pfeifer
Institut für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie
Universitätsklinikum Bonn (AöR)
Biomedizinisches Zentrum (BMZ)
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Summary

The CRC investigates metabolism/diabetes and focusses on brown adipose tissue. Adipose tissues are organized in two functionally distinct types, brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT). In contrast to white adipocytes, brown fat cells are specialized to dissipate energy in the form of heat (thermogenesis). Importantly, human BAT activity correlates with leanness and a beneficial cardiometabolic profile.

This consortium focuses on the regulation of thermogenesis:

1) the organ crosstalk between gut, liver, muscle and thermogenic adipose tissues,

2) the cell-cell communication within brown and beige fat, and

3) the interaction of cell organelles and intracellular signalling pathways in brown/beige adipocytes.

For this purpose, advanced omics technologies, cell culture systems of murine and human adipocytes, and novel transgenic mouse models will be used to provide comprehensive molecular mechanistic insight into the regulation of thermogenic energy metabolism. The mid- and long-term goal is to establish new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

Participating Institutions:

Universität Hamburg
Technische Universität München
Helmholtz Zentrum München

Term:
01.01.2022 - 31.12.2025 (1. Funding Period)

 
Site Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Tanja Schneider
Institut für Pharmazeutische Mikrobiologie
Meckenheimer Allee 168
53115 Bonn
 
Summary

Over decades we have experienced a dwindling pipeline of new structural scaffolds in antibiotic drug discovery. This is not to the least due to substantial knowledge gaps in fundamental antibiotic research and lack of insight into bacterial cell biology. It became obvious that, even for long-established antibiotics, we often do not understand the cellular consequences of inhibiting a given target, although the direct ligand-target interactions are thoroughly studied. However, it is often the pleiotropic downstream effects following primary target interaction which cause efficient bacterial killing, such as the subsequent deregulation or disintegration of large biosynthetic machineries. Studying antibiotic action on the cellular level will allow us to differentiate potent from less potent antibacterial mechanisms, to elucidate the reasons for synergistic activities between antibiotics, and to explain specificities related to certain species or cell types. Likewise, with regard to antibiotic production, many antibiotic gene clusters and related enzyme functions are known. However, we know little about the localization and physical interactions within biosynthetic production machineries as well as about the physiology of the producer cell in the course of the production process. Studying the functional interplay between the various components of the biosynthetic machinery, its integration into cellular regulatory networks and cross-talk with the primary metabolism, as well as producer stress and adaptations, we aim towards a more rational and efficient production process.Recent advances in bacterial cell biology have demonstrated the astounding degree of functional organization in bacterial cells, where vital processes require elaborate spatiotemporal control of the components involved. Obviously, antibiotic action and production have to be considered and studied in this context. Modern cell biology has provided technologies to enable such studies as much as antibiotic research can provide valuable inhibitors and tools for bacterial cell biology. In the TR-CRC ‘Cellular Mechanisms of Antibiotic Action and Production’ (acronym ‘ANTIBIOTIC CellMAP’), we propose to study antibiotic action and antibiotic production side-by-side within living bacteria, yet with a molecular focus. It is our vision to explore the cellular mechanisms of antibiotic action and production in space and time – thereby contributing to an ‘ANTIBIOTIC CellMAP’ – to simultaneously lay a foundation for more rational approaches in antibiotic drug discovery in the future and improve our understanding of fundamental principles of the cellular organization of prokaryotic life.  

Participating Institution:

  • Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen (Speaker-University)

Term 

01.07.2019 - 30.06.2023 (1. Funding Period)

Website45551  

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Georg Nickenig
Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Summary

The aorta is composed of the aortic valve, the ascending aorta with its root and arch, as well as the thoracic and abdominal sections of the descending aorta. It connects the heart with the peripheral circulation and organs, and it is involved in the complex regulation of hemodynamics. Although each section of the aorta has a unique composition, is exposed to distinct mechanical forces, and therefore, develops specific disease phenotypes, different aortic disorders share some of the same pathophysiological mechanisms: biological, chemical, and mechanical stressors promote dysfunction of the aortic endothelial lining, recruitment and activation of immune cells, and subsequent modification of interstitial cell metabolism. This local proinflammatory milieu stimulates an increased and faulty deposition of extracellular matrix, posttranslational matrix remodeling, and premature calcification as a critical prerequisite for aortic wall or valve injury. There are two apparent sources for these effects: resident factors and circulating, non-resident factors. Within the aorta itself, resident effectors include oxidative and mechanical stress, as well as modulation of endothelial and interstitial cells and the extracellular matrix. In addition, there are a number of non-resident factors that contribute to aortic disease, including immune cells, red blood cells, platelets, fat cells, and various signaling molecules. An individual’s susceptibility for developing disease is largely determined by a, yet unclear, genetic predisposition. While aortic diseases occur frequently, are associated with high mortality, and often require hazardous interventions, the distinct pathologies of the aortic system have never been systematically investigated. The interconnection and mutual impact of aortic diseases on each other within the complex aortic system remains obscured.With this initiative, we aim to address the underlying resident and non-resident molecular and cellular mechanisms of aortic disease in a holistic manner, with a particular focus on aortic valve stenosis, aortic aneurysm, and aortic dissection. Prospectively, we envision identifying novel pharmacological, interventional, and surgical targets for diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies within the frame of translational and clinical studies. Clustered along the Rhine River, the three universities involved in the Aortic Disease CRC/Transregio proposal are bringing together basic and clinical science experts, and will fill a gap that currently exists in cardiovascular research. This collaboration has positioned the three institutions perfectly to investigate the causes of aortic disease, and hopefully in further funding periods, to begin to move towards new treatment regimens.

Participating Institutions:

  • Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf
  • Universität zu Köln
  • IUF - Leibniz-Institut für umweltmedizinische Forschung gGmbH, Düsseldorf
  • University of Amsterdam

Term:
01.07.2019 - 30.06.2023 (1. Funding Period)

Website56665

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Gunther Hartmann
Institut für Klinische Chemie und Klinische Pharmakologie
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Summary

All forms of life have established sophisticated mechanisms to detect and eliminate foreign genetic material. Over the last decades, this research has followed three principle directions: pattern recognition, nucleic acid restriction factors, and nucleic acid metabolism. These three principles are integral parts of a larger nucleic acid defense system, which we now refer to as Nucleic Acid Immunity. In this defense system, a repertoire of germ line-encoded pattern recognition receptors detects non-self nucleic acids which then triggers a broad set of effector functions by engaging signaling cascades that range from chemokine and cytokine release to cell death programs. In contrast, nucleic acid restriction factors exert a direct or short-circuit inhibitory function. A third group of proteins comprises nucleases and other components of nucleic acid metabolism that regulate the abundance or composition of nucleic acids. Recent insight into Nucleic Acid Immunity comes from research on interferonopathies, rare monogenetic type I interferon-dominated inflammatory disorders. These studies showed that genetic defects not only in pattern recognition receptors but also in restriction factors and nucleases result in the erroneous detection of self nucleic acids with often devastating clinical consequences. Thus, the diverse pathways involved in Nucleic Acid Immunity have fundamental implications for human health and disease. The overall goal of this initiative is to gain new insight into the specific molecular mechanisms of the defense against foreign nucleic acids. Projects were selected to collaboratively address urgent overarching questions in this field: i) How is nucleic acid metabolism functionally connected to the nucleic acid defense system? ii) How are defined stress responses linked to the nucleic acid defense pathways? iii) What are the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the link of DNA damage and repair pathways to nucleic acid defense pathways? iv) What are the molecular switches that regulate a predominant type I IFN response versus inflammasome-induced cell death? v) What are the pathogenic principles by which dysregulated nucleic acid immunity causes sterile inflammatory disease? vi) How does recognition of pathogen-associated nucleic acids contribute to the initiation of an antimicrobial response, and how does dysregulation limit the resolution of infection and trigger infection-associated autoimmune phenotypes? vii) What are the implications for antimicrobial defense against pathogens switching host species within their life cycle (e.g. insect-transmitted virus)? The projects of this consortium are uniquely positioned to collaboratively address these critical questions thereby improving our understanding of the basic principles and the clinical implications of the immunopathology associated with Nucleic Acid Immunity. This insight will facilitate the development of new treatments tailored to various clinical inflammatory conditions.


Participating Institutions:

  • Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
  • Technische Universität Dresden
  • Max Planck Institut für Biochemie, Planegg
  • Philipps-Universität Marburg
  • Technische Universität München

Term:

01.07.2018 - 30.06.2022 (1. Funding Period)

Website677

Site Spokesperson

Professor Dr. Britta Klagge
Geographisches Institut
Meckenheimer Allee 166
53115 Bonn

Summary

The Collaborative Research Center (CRC) combines expertise from two complementary centers of excellence at the Universities of Bonn and Cologne to study newly emerging issues of social-ecological transformation and future-making in Africa. It takes current large-scale landuse change in rural Africa as its starting point. Focusing on the two seemingly opposite, yet often mutually constitutive processes of intensification and conservation, it investigates their impact on social-ecological transformation in the context of three major growth corridors in eastern and southern Africa. While social-ecological transformation is commonly understood in relation to past processes, this CRC takes a different perspective: It conceptualizes socialecological transformation as an expression of ‘future-making’. Resonating with current debates in the interdisciplinary field of future studies, this means that potential futures and the different ideas of how they can be realized are seen to have a decisive impact on current land-use dynamics, especially through diverse processes and politics of anticipation. ‘Futuremaking’ refers to physical changes as well as social practices that link the present to the future in various ways. Whereas natural scientists primarily study how a ‘future of probabilities’ is anticipated in different forms of calculation, measurements and models, the social scientists also take into account how a ‘future of possibilities’ takes shape in visions and imaginations. Together, the projects of the CRC will analyze how such different approaches to the future inform practices of large-scale land-use change, and how they relate to each other. Special emphasis will be put on surprises and unintended side-effects of future-making, which play a key role in characterizing rural Africa today.The CRC is structured in three project groups, each organized around a bridging concept that addresses specific aspects of social-ecological transformation and future-making (Figure 1). Project group A (‘coupling’) studies the articulation between social and ecological subsystems, B (‘boundaries’) looks at the shifting zones of interaction and confrontation, and C (‘linkages’) explores cross-scalar drivers, connections and causations. Empirical research focuses on development hubs in the Kenyan Rift Valley, the Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor of Tanzania, and the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area. The CRC builds upon profound research experience of the applicants and African counterparts, amplifies the unique combination of expertise at the universities of Bonn and Cologne, fosters partnerships with scholars and scientific institutions in Africa, and aims at making Bonn-Cologne one of the leading centers of innovative research in the emerging field of futures studies and social ecology in Africa.

Participating Institutions:

  • Universität zu Köln (Speaker University)
  • Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC)
  • Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin
  • Cooperation partners in Africa

Term:

01.01.2018 - 31.12.2025 (2. Funding Period)

Website77788

Site Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Sven Rady
Haussdorff Center for Mathematics &
Institute for Microeconomics
Adenauerallee 24-42
53115 Bonn

Summary

The Collaborative Research Center (CRC) addresses three key societal challenges:

(i) how to promote equality of opportunity;

(ii) how to regulate markets in light of the internationalization and digitalization of economic activity; and

(iii) how to safeguard the stability of the financial system.In a market economy, individual consumption and investment decisions and the prevailing market conditions shape personal well-being and life outcomes.

An individual’s decision-making abilities and skills are largely formed in the family and at school. The prevailing market conditions are the result of decisions made by other participants in product and financial markets—markets that are embedded in the legal and regulatory system. This perspective suggests connections among three important policy areas: family and education policies; product market regulation; and financial market regulation.The CRC contributes to the foundations of decision-making in these three areas, starting from the premise that adequate answers to the above challenges must be based on representations of human behavior that are appropriate for the issues at hand. Based on a wide methodological spectrum of expertise in theoretical and empirical economics, the CRC assesses how specific policies and institutions affect economic outcomes and develops novel institutional and policy solutions.Strong complementarities among the projects within each area, across the three areas, and between the two locations provide the basis for internationally visible research that highlights economics as a social science addressing societal challenges. Targeted dissemination activities and the CRC researchers’ broad experience in communicating their findings to diverse audiences ensure the policy impact of this research. 

Participating Institution:

  • Universität Mannheim (Speaker University)

Term:

01.01.2018 - 31.12.2025 (2. Funding Period)

Website8899999

Site Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Corinna Kollath
Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik
Nussallee 14-16
53115 Bonn

Summary

A common presumption in quantum physics is that for systems to be dominated by quantum effects they must be isolated from influences of the environment as good as possible. This isolation is considered to be a key requirement for many quantum technologies. The central paradigm of the CRC/TR 185 is the opposite approach. We consider the coupling to reservoirs as potentially useful tools rather than an unavoidable nuisance. The vision is to utilize external drive and properly tailored reservoirs to counteract the effects of generic, uncontrolled environments and to create a toolbox of open system control for few- and many-body quantum systems. This comprises the generation, control and stabilization of interesting and useful quantum states as well as the stimulation and manipulation of collective processes. It also includes the exploration of the interface between the field of topological systems with open system control. We aim to understand the underlying mechanisms of open systems and to exploit them as new tools going far beyond what is possible in closed systems. The research field of open-system control of quantum matter is a very recent one. During the first funding period the CRC/TR 185 has taken a key role in shaping this field. The experimental platforms underlying our research are atoms and photons, for which the technology of manipulation and detection are most advanced and a microscopic control as well as a detailed understanding of system and environment is possible. The systems reach from driven photon condensates over single atoms, which are coupled to quantum light, to ultracold atomic quantum gases. The research program is structured in three complementary areas. Research area A 'Few-body quantum systems and environments' follows a bottum up approach and explores the influence of tailored environments on individual or few-body quantum systems. Therefore, the experimental platforms are chosen with a maximum degree of control. Research area B 'Control of quantum many-body systems by environments' focuses on the generation, control and manipulation of collective states or processes of complex many-body systems. Due to the complexity of the system, typically not all degrees of freedom can be controlled and measured and the theoretical treatment is very challenging. Research area C 'Topological states in atomic and photonic systems' interfaces the directions of open-system control and topological protection, where the goal is to devise a general approach to protect quantum states by combining these two areas.

Participating Institution:

  • Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (Speaker-University)

Term:

01.07.2016  - 30.06.2024 (2. Funding Period)

Website91010

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Ulf-G. Meißner
Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik
Nußallee 14-16
53115 Bonn

Summary

The main theme of this CRC is the role of symmetries and the emergence of structure in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Here, the complex structures that are investigated include hadrons as well as nuclei, as these are different manifestations of the strong force. It is the great strength of this CRC that the fields of hadronic and nuclear physics are considered together, as it is now accepted also world-wide. We have made quite some progress in all the various projects, with particular emphasis on the so-called exotic XYZ-states (and other exotic or unusual states) that have been at the center of many experimental and theoretical investigations all over the world in the past years. This CRC also combines in a unique fashion various techniques to tackle these difficult strongly interacting many-particle problems, namely effective field theories, lattice simulations and modeling. In particular, lattice simulations are now also applied to atomic nuclei and we intend to further strengthen this line of research, in strong synergy with the colleagues who investigate hadron structure and dynamics using such methods. In the second funding period, there was a continued focus on hadron physics aspects which was due to the existing collaborations with Chinese colleagues. In the second funding period we started collaborations in nuclear physics too, and accordingly in this period nuclear physics research increased. Consequently, hadron and nuclear physics will also be the main themes in the third period with an increased focus on projects requiring substantial computational resources. This reflects the increased contribution of high-performance computing in physics.


Participating Institutions:

  • Technische Universität München
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peking, China
  • Ruhr-Universität Bochum
  • Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peking, China
  • Peking University, China

Term

01.07.2012 - 30.06.2024 (3. Funding Period)

Website10111111


Participation in SFB/TRR

Researchers of the University of Bonn are involved in the following Collaborative Research Centers and Transregios headed by other universities with their with individual subprojects. 

Eine Wissenschaftlerin und ein Wissenschaftler arbeiten hinter einer Glasfassade und mischen Chemikalien mit Großgeräten.
© colourbox

SFB and TRR with participation researchers from Bonn

Teilprojektleiter Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Bernd Fleischmann
Institut für Physiologie I, Life & Brain
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Zusammenfassung
Traditionally, heart research has strongly focussed on cardiac myocytes: they are the motors underlying cardiac pumping, driving classic clinical read-outs such as blood pressure or ECG. Cardiomyocytes occupy about two thirds of cardiac muscle volume. But: the significantly smaller non-myocytes – such as connective tissue and immune cells – form a majority, accounting for more than two thirds of the cells in the heart. After tissue lesioning, e.g. in myocardial infarction, non-myocytes play a key role in repair and tissue remodelling. They support the structural integrity of the heart – without, however, pumping themselves. Their presence can also disrupt the normal electrical activity that precedes each heartbeat. Our knowledge of cellular identities of non-myocytes, the mechanisms and relevance of their interactions, and the use of this knowledge to steer repair processes, is still in its infancy. These areas will be investigated by the CRC 1425, with the long-term aim of developing new methods for diagnosis and therapy of heart disease. In doing so, the CRC is not primarily targeting scar prevention or retransformation into functional muscle tissue, but rather pursuing a new and complementary approach, working with nature’s own repair processes ‘to make better scars’.

Sprecher: Universität Freiburg

Laufzeit: seit 2020

Website

Teilprojektleiter Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. med. Eicke Latz
Institut für Angeborene Immunität
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Zelltod ist ein grundlegender biologischer Prozess, der für die Aufrechterhaltung der Gewebshomöostase entscheidend ist und eine zentrale Rolle bei der Interaktion zwischen Wirt und Mikroorganismen und bei der Abwehr von Krankheitserregern in Tieren und Pflanzen spielt. Die jüngsten Entdeckungen molekular kontrollierter Pathways für lytischen Zelltod, darunter Nekroptose, Pyroptose und Ferroptose, haben gezeigt, dass Zellen zwischen verschiedenen Arten des regulierten Zelltods (regulated cell death, RCD) wählen können und zur Entwicklung des Konzepts geführt, dass die Auswirkungen des Zelltods auf der Ebene des Gewebes und des Organismus durch die Todesart einer Zelle wesentlich beeinflusst werden. Sterbende Zellen regulieren die Gewebeantwort durch Interaktion mit benachbarten Zellen, allerdings ist unklar, wie die Art des Zelltods das Ergebnis dieser Interaktion bestimmt. Während heute allgemein anerkannt ist, dass die verschiedenen RCD-Wege unterschiedliche Funktionen haben, beginnen wir erst jetzt, ihre jeweiligen physiologischen Rollen und deren Verknüpfung miteinander zu verstehen. Darüber hinaus sind die Mechanismen, die bestimmen, ob, wann und wie eine Zelle stirbt und welche Auswirkungen dies auf das umgebende Gewebe hat, noch wenig verstanden. Das übergeordnete Ziel dieses Sonderforschungsbereichs ist es, die Regulationsmechanismen sowie die funktionellen und physiologischen Folgen verschiedener Arten von RCD in der Physiologie und Pathologie des Organismus zu verstehen, wobei der Schwerpunkt auf Immunität, Entzündung und Wirt-Mikroben-Interaktionen liegt. Ein einzigartiger Aspekt unseres Ansatzes besteht darin, die Regulierung und Funktion des Zelltods bei Tieren und Pflanzen zu erforschen, um eine wechselseitige Befruchtung der beiden Felder unter Nutzung ihrer komplementären Stärken zu ermöglichen. Durch die Kombination von multi- und interdisziplinären Ansätzen zielt dieser SFB darauf ab, Antworten auf offene grundlegende Fragen in der Zelltodforschung zu geben und wichtige Beiträge zum besseren Verständnis der Regulierung und Funktion der verschiedenen Formen von RCD in der Physiologie und Pathologie des Organismus sowie der zugrundeliegenden Mechanismen zu leisten.

Sprecher: Universität zu Köln

Laufzeit: seit 

Website14

 

Teilprojektleiter Universität Bonn

Professor Dr. Michael Hölzel
Institut für Klinische Chemie und Klinische Pharmakologie
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Das kleinzellige Bronchialkarzinom (SCLC) ist die aggressivste Lungenkrebs-Unterart. Leider ist nur wenig über die molekularen Mechanismen der Tumorentstehung bekannt. Insbesondere gibt es keine molekulare Erklärung für ein zentrales klinisches Merkmal: Während SCLC typischerweise initial empfindlich ist gegenüber Chemotherapie, ereilt die Patienten regelhaft ein therapieresistentes Rezidiv in kürzester Zeit. Kürzlich entdeckte Erkenntnisse über die Molekularbiologie dieser Tumore lieferten erste mechanistische Erkenntnisse. Wir planen nun, dieses neu gewonnene Wissen zu nutzen und eine ganze Reihe mechanistischer Analysen zu verfolgen, um unser Verständnis der molekularen Pathogenese des SCLC zu verbessern mit dem Ziel der Übertragung unserer neuartigen Erkenntnisse in die klinische Anwendung. Unser Konsortium ist hochgradig interdisziplinär und umfasst Fachwissen in den Bereichen Biochemie und Signaltransduktion, Strukturbiologie und Wirkstoffdesign, Tumorimmunologie, Mausmodelle, bioinformatische Krebsgenomik, molekulare Pathologie, sowie klinische Studien. Mitglieder unseres Konsortiums verfügen über umfassende Erfahrung in der interdisziplinären, fakultätsübergreifenden Zusammenarbeit. Wir bauen unser Konsortium auf einem Portfolio etablierter technologischer Plattformen auf, wie Genomik, Immunomik, Zellmodelle, genetische Mausmodelle und Bildgebung, sowie Algorithmen zum Verständnis der molekularen Evolution von SCLC. Ein besonderer Schwerpunkt liegt auf der Charakterisierung von Entdeckungen aus Hochdurchsatz-Assays in nachgeschalteten mechanistischen Experimenten. Unsere wissenschaftlichen Bemühungen sind eng mit der Klinik verbunden über eine translationale Plattform, die ein longitudinales Monitoring der Tumore unter Therapie und so Einblicke in Mechanismen der Evolution ermöglicht. Unser Ansatz wird so zu neuen Strategien für therapeutische Interventionen führen, die die Therapieresistenz überwinden können und letztendlich den Weg für kurative therapeutische Ansätze in der Zukunft ebnen. Zusätzlich zu unseren wissenschaftlichen Zielen wird dieser SFB den Leuchtturm für Präzisionsmedizin in Köln massiv stärken und dazu beitragen, die interdisziplinäre Forschung an unterschiedlichen Krebsarten miteinander zu verbinden. Ein wesentliches Augenmerk liegt auf für der Ausbildung junger Wissenschaftler und Kliniker. Insbesondere unser Graduiertenkolleg wird die strukturierte wissenschaftliche Ausbildung unserer Doktoranden durch einheitliche Kurse, vierteljährliche Symposien und ein etabliertes Austauschprogramm mit dem Massachusetts Institute of Technology und der Stanford University fördern.

Sprecher: Universität zu Köln

Laufzeit

Website

 

Teilprojektleiterin Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Mariacarla Gadebusch Bondio
Institute for Medical Humanities
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Der geplante Sonderforschungsbereich zielt auf die Untersuchung der historischen und kulturellen Grundlagen von Wachsamkeit. Der Leitbegriff der Vigilanz wurde gewählt, um zwei Besonderheiten hervorzuheben: Erstens bleibt ihre Bewertung unentschieden: Akte der Wachsamkeit lassen sich als notwendig, sinnvoll, gewinnbringend oder gar heilsnotwendig ausweisen. Sie versprechen dann Sicherheit, Berechenbarkeit, Sündenvermeidung usw. Sie können aber auch als bedrohlich wahrgenommen und markiert werden, als Indiskretion, Überwachung oder Disziplinierungsversuch. Zweitens lässt sich Wachsamkeit nie ganz an Institutionen delegieren oder durch Apparate erledigen. Sie basiert wesentlich auf der Mitwirkung von Einzelnen, welche ihre zugespitzte Aufmerksamkeit partiell und situativ in den Dienst einer höheren Aufgabe stellen. Der SFB will klären, wie Individuen hierbei kulturell motiviert und angeleitet werden und wie sie dabei mit politisch-sozialen Anreizsystemen sowie technischen und institutionellen Möglichkeiten interagieren. Er wendet sich damit Phänomenen zu, die Religion, Recht, Politik, Gesundheit und auch der Subjektkonstitution vielfältig zugrunde liegen, ohne bislang historisch und systematisch zusammenhängend untersucht worden zu sein. Um die lange, bis in die Gegenwart reichende Geschichte und breite Variabilität von Vigilanz zu erschließen, setzt er auf eine interdisziplinäre Forschungsanstrengung, welche Perspektiven aus den Geschichts- und Rechtswissenschaften, den Ethnologien, der Medizingeschichte sowie den Literatur , Kunst- und Theaterwissenschaften zusammenführt. Er vermeidet bewusst Vorentscheidungen über einen leitenden Sinn der Wachsamkeit (wie das Auge) oder ein dominantes Modell ihrer Organisation (wie das Panoptikum) und bezieht sowohl Formen der Wachsamkeit gegenüber sich selbst wie auch gegenüber anderen ein. Auf diese Weise wird ein disziplinär vielfältig anschlussfähiges und zugleich heuristisch neue Erkenntnisse erschließendes Konzept von hoher Gegenwartsrelevanz in Anschlag gebracht.

Sprecher: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Laufzeit

Website1515

 

Teilprojektleiterin Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Corinna Kollath
Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik
Nußallee 14-16
53115 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Die Entwicklung neuer Materialen ist eine wichtige Basis für technologische Innovationen, die unser tägliches Leben grundlegend - wenn auch oft unbemerkt - verändern. Beispiele hierfür sind etwa die Entwicklung neuartiger Datenspeicher, deren Lese- und Schreibköpfe in geschickter Weise den Magnetwiderstand nutzen. Die Entdeckung zweidimensionaler Materialien wie Graphen hat weltweit eine Welle an Forschungsinitiativen ausgelöst mit dem Ziel, innovative Anwendungen dieser faszinierenden Materialien zu erkunden. Ähnliches gilt für Spin-Bahn-gekoppelte Materialien wie die kürzlich entdeckten topologischen Isolatoren, deren neuartigen Eigenschaften ebenfalls komplett neue Funktionalitäten erwarten lassen. Der Schlüssel zu diesen Entwicklungen war eine Grundlagenforschung, welche die Entdeckung neuer Materialien, die Entwicklung neuer theoretischer Konzepte und die Suche nach dem Verständnis unbekannter Phänomene zum Ziel hatte. Die materialorientierte Grundlagenforschung ist daher ein sich rasch entwickelndes, interdisziplinäres, hoch kompetitives Feld. An vorderster Front dieses Feldes steht heute die Untersuchung von Quantenmaterialien, in denen relativistische Effekte wie die Spin-Bahn-Wechselwirkung und nicht-triviale Topologie eine tragende Rolle spielen. Gleichzeitig zeigt sich, dass in Materialien mit starken elektronischen Korrelationen besonders interessante Ordnungsphänomene wie Supraleitung, Magnetismus und andere exotische Phasen realisiert werden können. Genau an der Schnittstelle dieser Forschungsfelder möchten wir einen Sonderforschungs-bereich bilden mit den zentralen Zielen, Quantenmaterialien zu synthetisieren, umfassend zu charakterisieren und ultimativ eine präzise Kontrolle der physikalischen Eigenschaften dieser Materialien zu gewinnen – um ihre Dynamik zu verstehen, sie zu kontrollieren und neue Funktionalitäten zu ermöglichen. Gerade in Materialien, die starke Korrelationen mit interessanten topologischen Eigenschaften verknüpfen, erwarten wir eine Vielzahl von neuartigen, bisher noch unentdeckten Phänomenen. Um diese ambitionierten Ziele zu erreichen, haben wir ein breit aufgestelltes Team von Wissen-schaftlern aus experimenteller und theoretischer Physik, Kristallographie und Chemie geformt. Unterstützt wird dieses Team durch die ausgezeichnete wissenschaftliche Infrastruktur der Universität zu Köln – etwa den Kernprofilbereich „Quantenmaterie und -materialien“, den die Universität zu Köln als Teil ihrer institutionellen Strategie im Rahmen der Exzellenzinitiative etabliert hat. Das Kölner Team wird ergänzt durch zwei exzellente Gruppen mit unentbehrlichen Zusatzkompetenzen an der Universität Bonn und dem Forschungszentrum Jülich. Eine wichtige Basis unseres Forschungs-vorhabens ist es, den kompletten Kreislauf von „Materialien – physikalische Eigenschaften – Theorie“ innerhalb des geplanten Sonderforschungsbereichs zu realisieren, der bereits heute ein Eckpfeiler des Erfolgs der Kölner Festkörperphysik ist. Dabei werden physikalische Phänomene und Materialen aus einer Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Blickwinkel untersucht, die wir in fünf „focus areas“ zusammengefasst haben. Der geplante Sonderforschungsbereich wird den Forschungsschwerpunkt der Kölner Festkörperphysik und die assoziierten Gruppen in Bonn und Jülich stärken und zu einem international führenden Zentrum der Festkörperphysik ausbauen. Unsere Vision ist es, neuartige kollektive Phänomene in Quantenmaterialien, die aus dem Wechselspiel von Spin-Bahn-Wechselwirkung, Korrelationen und Topologie entstehen, zu entdecken, zu verstehen und zu kontrollieren.

Sprecher: Universität zu Köln

Laufzeit: seid 2016

Website

Teilprojektleiterin Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Christa E. Müller
Pharmazeutisches Institut
Pharmazeutische Chemie I
An der Immenburg 4
53121 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Extrazelluläre und intrazelluläre Adeninnukleotide (AN) steuern oder modulieren nahezu alle zentralen Vorgänge in Biologie und Medizin. Sie sind essentielle und ubiquitäre Moleküle, die grundlegende zelluläre Prozesse modulieren und regulieren, u.a. (i) die Zell-Zell-Kommunikation und (ii) die intrazelluläre Signaltransduktion.Im Bereich der extrazellulären AN gibt es folgende, bislang ungeklärte Fragestellungen. Bei der Signalfunktion während entzündlicher Prozesse durch extrazelluläre AN, z.B. Adenosintriphosphat (ATP) oder Nikotinamidadenindinukleotid (NAD), ist unklar, wie die Dynamik der zeitlich-räumlichen Freisetzung reguliert wird, wie der Umbau dieser AN durch Ektoenzyme erfolgt, und wie einzelne AN das Gleichgewicht entzündlicher Prozesse beeinflussen. Für intrazelluläre AN, die Funktionen als sekundäre Botenstoffe erfüllen, wie z.B. Nikotinsäureadenindinukleotidphosphat (NAADP) oder 3’-5’-Cyclo-Adenosinmonophosphat (cAMP), ist deren präzise Funktion bei der zeitlich-räumlichen Koordinierung von Signalprozessen häufig nicht bekannt. Dies betrifft insbesondere Fragen nach der Bildung von Mikrodomänen der sekundären Botenstoffe, z.B. mit metabolisierenden Enzymen, Bindungsproteinen oder Ionenkanälen, oder durch NAADP oder andere AN regulierte Calcium-Mikrodomänen.Das Hauptziel des SFB ist ein tieferes und genaueres Verständnis der regulatorischen Funktionen der AN, sowie deren Bildung bzw. Metabolismus im Kontext entzündlicher Erkrankungen. Spezifische Ziele sind das Verständnis (i) der Modulation des Gleichgewichts von pro- und anti-inflammatorischen Prozessen durch AN-metabolisierende Ektoenzyme und Rezeptoren, sowie (ii) der AN-vermittelten Signaltransduktion in den Bereich Calcium-und cAMP-Signaling in der Entzündung.Als Basis für den SFB dient das Forschungsnetzwerk “Regulatory Adenine Nucleotides at Membranes” (Landesforschungsförderung Hamburg; Förderung von 2014 bis 2017). Neben Wissenschaftlern des zentralen Standorts Hamburg sind ausgewiesene Forscher aus Göttingen, Bonn, München und Genua (Italien) beteiligt. Durch Integration unterschiedlicher Fachgebiete soll durch den SFB eine neue, integrale Sichtweise von AN-Biologie und -Pathophysiologie entwickelt werden. Diese dient dann als Basis für neuartige diagnostische Methoden und innovative Behandlungsstrategien im Bereich entzündlicher Erkrankungen des Immunsystems, des Fettgewebes, sowie des zentralen Nervensystems.

Beteiligte Hochschulen:

  • Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München 
  • Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Sprecher-Hochschule)
  • Georg-August-Universität Göttingen 
  • Università degli Studi di Genova 

Beteiligte Einrichtung:

  • Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche Institute of Protein Biochemistry, Napoli 

Laufzeit: Seit 2018

Website

Teilprojektleiterin Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Thomas Becker
Institut für Biochemie und Molekularbiologie
Nußallee 11
53115 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Mitochondrien sind essentielle Zellorganelle mit zentraler Funktion für den zellulären Energiehaushalt. Jüngste Forschungen zeichneten jedoch ein deutlich komplexeres Bild der Rolle der Mitochondrien innerhalb der Zelle und identifizierten Mitochondrien als dynamische zelluläre Strukturen, die in vielfältiger Weise mit der zellulären Umgebung kommunizieren. Geänderte physiologische Bedingungen führen zu einer Anpassung der Aktivität der Mitochondrien. Gleichzeitig sind Mitochondrien aber auch Bestandteil verschiedener zellulärer Signalwege und beeinflussen die Aktivität, Differenzierung und das Überleben der Zelle. Die wechselseitigen Interaktionen von Mitochondrien mit der zellulären Umgebung werfen auch vielfältige neue Fragen zur Pathogenese von Erkrankungen auf, die auf eine Funktionsstörung der Mitochondrien zurückzuführen sind. Um diese komplexen und häufig neuartigen Zusammenhänge aufzuklären, verfolgt der Sonderforschungs-bereich 1218 einen interdisziplinären Ansatz und führt Forschungsgruppen mit komplementärer Expertise in einem Forschungsverbund zusammen. Teilprojekte im Forschungsbereich A untersuchen die Anpassung der Mitochondrien an sich ändernde zelluläre Bedingungen und fokussieren insbesondere auf die Rolle der mitochondrialen Dynamik für die Aufrechterhaltung der funktionellen Integrität der Organelle. Der Schwerpunkt der Arbeiten im Forschungsbereich B liegt auf Signalwegen, die durch Mitochondrien unter Stress und pathologischen Bedingungen reguliert werden. Insgesamt ermöglichen die Arbeiten innerhalb des Sonderforschungsbereiches einen integrativen Einblick auf die komplexe Regulation der zellulären Funktion durch Mitochondrien, eine wichtige Voraussetzung für das Verständnis mitochondrialer Erkrankungen und die Entwicklung neuer therapeutischer Strategien.

Sprecher: Universität zu Köln

Laufzeit: seit

Website19

Teilprojektleiterin Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Claudia Knief
Institut für Nutzpflanzenwissenschaften und Ressourcenschutz
Bereich Bodenwissenschaften
Nußallee 13
53115 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Ziel dieses Projekts ist es, die Forschung im Bereich der wechselseitigen Beziehung zwischen biologischer Evolution und Landschaftsevolution maßgeblich voranzutreiben. Arbeitsgebiete sind aride bis hyperaride Systeme, in denen sowohl biologische Aktivität als auch Erdoberflächenprozesse vorwiegend und sehr stark durch die Verfügbarkeit von Wasser limitiert sind. In diesem Projekt sollen die Schlüsselmerkmale biologischer Aktivität in extrem wasserlimitierten Habitaten der Erde identifiziert und Erdoberflächenprozesse, die unter nahezu wasserfreien Bedingungen ablaufen, charakterisiert werden. Die Bestimmung kritischer Schwellenwerte der Umweltbedingungen, die eine biologische Kolonisation und/oder Landschaftstransformationen erlauben, stellt ein wesentliches Ziel dar. Das zeitliche und räumliche Muster biologischer Kolonisation und Isolation wird zusammen mit der Chronologie der Landschaftsentwicklung in Bezug zur auschlaggebenden gemeinsamen Triebkraft, dem (Paleo-) Klima, untersucht. Diese Ziele sollen durch: (i) paleoklimatische Rekonstruktion und Observation des gegenwärtigen Klimas, zur Entwicklung geeigneter Klimamodelle, (ii) Erfassung der biogeographischen Migrationsgeschichte, Phylogenie (Pflanzen, Insekten, Protisten und Bakterien) und deren molekularer Datierung und (iii) räumliche Erfassung, Prozesscharakterisierung und Datierung von (fossilen) Landschaftselementen (Entwässerungssysteme, Hänge, fluviale und aeolische Sedimente, Böden), angegangen werden. Die Datierung geologischer Archive (i & iii) erfordert eine innovative (Weiter-) Entwicklung isotopengeologischer Methoden, welche entsprechend durchgeführt werden sollen.Es werden u.a. wesentliche Beiträge zu den sich entwickelnden Konzepten des evolutionären Timelags (Guerreo et al. 2013, PNAS 110, 11469-11474), des Einflusses geographischer Barrieren auf klimabedingte Speziesmigration (Burrows et al. 2014, Nature 507, 492-495), der Biogeomorphologie (Corenbilt et al. 2011, Earth Sci. Rev. 106, 307-331), sowie der Entwicklung neuer Methoden zur Datierung und Prozesscharakterisierung von Erdoberflächenprozessen und biologischer Evolution erwartet.

Sprecher: Universität zu Köln

Laufzeit:
seit 2016

Website20

Teilprojektleiter Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Christian Kurts
Institut für Experimentelle Immunologie
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Immunvermittelte glomeruläre Erkrankungen sind eine heterogene Gruppe von Erkrankungen, die primär eine schädigende Entzündungsreaktion in den Glomeruli und sekundär auch in anderen Kompartimenten der Niere hervorrufen. Trotz jüngster Fortschritte auf diesem Forschungsgebiet ist die Immunpathogenese der verschieden Formen dieser Erkrankung nur unvollständig verstanden. Ihnen liegt eine immunvermittelte Nierenschädigung zugrunde, die mit einer spezifischen Immunantwort beginnt und im Verlauf zu einer destruierenden Entzündung des Nierengewebes führt. Die Behandlung von Patienten mit immunvermittelten glomerulären Erkrankungen besteht zumeist in einer unspezifischen Immunsuppression, die toxisch und nur teilweise effektiv ist. Diese Gruppe von Erkrankungen ist daher immer noch eine der häufigsten Ursachen für eine terminale Niereninsuffizienz in der westlichen Welt. Für die Entwicklung von effektiveren und sichereren Therapiestrategien müssen die zugrundeliegenden Pathomechanismen besser untersucht werden und die Ergebnisse dieser Studien in neue Therapiekonzepte umgesetzt werden. Die vorgeschlagene SFB-Initiative stellt einen interdisziplinären Ansatz dar, bei dem Wissenschaftler mit großer Expertise in klinischer und experimenteller Nephrologie, Grundlagenimmunologie, Pathologie / Anatomie und Physiologie zusammenarbeiten werden. Durch Verwendung von "state of the art" Methoden und Tiermodellen, in Kombination mit prospektiven klinischen Studien in großen Patientenkohorten, hat die SFB-Initiative die Charakterisierung zentraler immunpathogenetischer Mechanismen zum Ziel.Diese Studien sind eine Grundvoraussetzung für einen Paradigmenwechsel auf dem Gebiet der immunvermittelten glomerulären Erkrankungen, weg von einer ungezielten immunsuppressiven Behandlung hin zur einer Pathogenese-basierten, personalisierten Therapiestrategie.

Sprecher: Universität Hamburg

Laufzeit: seit 2016

Website21

Teilprojektleiter Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. med. Eicke Latz
Institut für Angeborene Immunität
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Beteiligte Hochschulen:Arterielle Gefäßerkrankungen, wie koronare Herzkrankheit (KHK) und Schlafanfall, bleiben die weltweit führende Todesursache und verursachen enorme sozioökonomische Kosten. Dieses Dilemma könnte durch verbesserte vaskuläre Prävention und Therapie gelindert werden, was eine vertiefte mechanistische Durchdringung der Atherosklerose als zugrundeliegender Pathologie voraussetzt, um eine effizientere Identifizierung von Kandidaten für eine potentielle Medikamentenentwicklung zu ermöglichen. Neben der Entdeckung von PCSK9 Inhibitoren zur besseren Kontrolle der Hyperlipidämie hat der positive Ausgang der CANTOS Studie deutliche Evidenz für die Bedeutung entzündlicher Signalwege in der Pathogenese und Therapie der Atherosklerose geliefert. Daher hält die Mission des SFB1123 an, ein Detailverständnis molekularer Netzwerke in der Atherogenese, Atheroprogression und Atherothrombose auszubilden und so die Identifizierung und Validierung relevanter therapeutischer Zielstrukturen voranzutreiben. Die Identifizierung therapeutischer Zielstrukturen innerhalb solcher Netzwerke erfordert die unvoreingenommene Prüfung und Auslese von Kandidaten auf einem soliden pathogenetischen Fundament und die Analyse ihrer Interaktionen in Modellsystemen. Im Projekt planen wir, mit der systematischen Ausarbeitung und Verknüpfung von Mechanismen diverser Molekülfamilien (Zytokine, Signalproteine, Nukleinsäuren und Lipidmediatoren) fortzufahren. Dazu werden modernste Technologien, wie Genomeditierung und konditionale Mausmodelle zur Gendeletion und Zellmarkierung, Proteomik und Bioinformatik, sowie neueste Bildgebungsmethoden (Optoakustik, Nanoskopie, MS Imaging) implementiert, um Zellbewegung, Funktion, subzelluläre und molekulare Ereignisse in Plaques oder Adventitia zu verfolgen, neue Standards für das Projekt zu setzen und methodische Lücken zu schließen. Auf Basis exzellenter Infrastruktur, Kooperationskultur und Nachwuchsrekrutierung wird das Projekt weiter molekulare und zelluläre Determinanten der Atherosklerose dechiffrieren und neue Verbindungen genetischer, entzündlicher und metabolischer Faktoren aufdecken. Durch die Klärung von Interaktionen und kombinierten Effekte wird der SFB1123 wertvolle Zielstrukturen und Therapiekandidaten mit weniger Nebenwirkungen auf Immunsystem und Stoffwechsel identifizieren.
 

Beteiligte Hochschulen:

  • Technische Universität München (Sprecher-Hochschule)

Beteiligte Einrichtung:

  • Helmholtz Zentrum München
    Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt
 
Laufzeit: seit 2014
 

Teilprojektleiter Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Frank Bertoldi
Argelander Institut für Astronomie
Auf dem Hügel 71
53121 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Der SFB 956 “Bedingungen und Auswirkungen der Sternentstehung – Astrophysik, Instrumentierung und Labor“ bündelt die einzigartige Expertise der Astrophysik-Gruppen im Hinblick auf drei Ziele: Auf der wissenschaftlichen Seite nutzt der SFB die sich jetzt bietenden neuen astronomischen Beobachtungsmöglichkeiten, die sich durch die Öffnung des sub mm- und ferninfraroten Spektralbereichs und die interferometrische Techniken im Hinblick auf höchste räumliche Auflösung vom Radio- bis zum infraroten Spektralbereich ergeben. Die wissenschaftliche Fragestellung zielt auf das Verständnis der fundamentalen Prozesse und deren Abhängigkeit von den physikalischen und chemischen Bedingungen im interstellaren Raum, durch die sich die interstellare Materie zu dichten Wolken zusammenballt und schließlich neue Sterne entstehen. Diese Bedingungen für Sternentstehung werden maßgeblich durch die energetische Rückwirkung junger Sterne und die chemische Zusammensetzung des interstellaren Mediums aufgrund der Elementsynthese in früheren Sterngenerationen beeinflusst, und außerdem durch äußere Faktoren wie Galaxien-Kollisionen, die zu Sternentstehungsausbrüchen führen, und durch Wechselwirkung der interstellaren Materie mit Jets und zentralen Winden in aktiven galaktischen Kernen. Die bislang begrenzte Einsicht in die Mechanismen, die den Sternentstehungsprozess in verschiedenen Umgebungen kontrollieren, hat gezeigt, dass physikalische Prozesse auf breiten Skalen, angefangen von der großräumigen Ausbreitung von Strahlung und Stoßwellen, bis zur Mikrophysik der Reaktionsprozesse relevant sind und verstanden werden müssen. Die Komplexität der Phänomene führt zu einem erstaunlichen Reichtum in der chemischen Zusammensetzung und zu kleinsträumigen Variationen im interstellaren Medium. Beide haben wiederum Einfluss auf die Energiebilanz, aber insbesondere erlauben sie sehr spezifische diagnostische Möglichkeiten durch spektral und räumlich höchstaufgelöste Beobachtungen, die mit detaillierten Modellen verglichen werden. Die spektrale Signatur dieser Phänomene kann am besten im sub mm- und infraroten Spektralbereich untersucht werden. Das astrophysikalische Forschungsprogramm des SFB hat die Untersuchung dieser Fragen zum Ziel und nutzt die führende Rolle der SFB Partnerinstitute im Bereich der sub mm- bis Infrarot–Instrumentierung.Das strategische Ziel des SFB 956 ist es, durch Koordination der Forschung an den beteiligten Instituten in den vier Gebieten der experimentellen Astrophysik, der theoretischen Analyse und Modellierung, der Laborastrophysik und der Entwicklung von Detektoren und Instrumentierung einen sowohl auf nationalem wie auch internationalem Niveau wettbewerbsfähigen Verbund zu etablieren, der aufgrund genügender Ressourcen und einer gut organisierten Infrastruktur mit der schnellen Entwicklung in diesem Forschungsfeld Schritt halten kann. Astronomische Observatorien und deren Instrumentierung haben eine Größe erreicht, die nur von großen Konsortien und in internationaler Partnerschaft getragen und effizient genutzt werden kann. Eine erfolgreiche Teilnahme an diesen Kollaborationen und die adäquate Vertretung der Interessen der beteiligten lokalen Wissenschaftlergemeinschaft ist nur auf einer höchst-qualifizierten und effizienten Basis möglich, die Synergien nutzt und mittel- bis langfristig stabile Perspektiven für die Forschungsarbeit bietet, wie sie durch einen SFB ermöglicht werden. Als ebenso wichtiges Ziel will der SFB 956 ein herausforderndes und exzellentes Umfeld für die Ausbildung der Studierenden und des wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses schaffen. Das attraktive Forschungsumfeld dieses SFB, das einen frühzeitigen Kontakt mit der aktuellen Forschung und den herausragenden instrumentellen Methoden im Labor und astronomischen Observatorien ermöglicht, und insbesondere die vielfältigen nationalen und internationalen Kollaborationen und der wissenschaftliche Austausch im Wettbewerb, wie sie in diesem SFB kultiviert werden, bilden dafür die besten Voraussetzungen.

Beteiligte Institutionen

  • Universität zu Köln (Sprecher-Hochschule)
  • Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn
  • Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETHZ)
  • University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA

Laufzeit: seit 2011

Website23

Teilprojektleiter Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Jeroen Dickschat
Kekulé-Institut für Organische Chemie und Biochemie
Gerhard-Domagk-Str. 1
53121 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Unter dem Titel „Ökologie, Physiologie und Molekularbiologie der Roseobacter-Gruppe: Aufbruch zu einem systembiologischen Verständnis einer global wichtigen Gruppe mariner Bakterien“ forschen Wissenschaftler aus Oldenburg, Braunschweig und Göttingen im SFB TRR 51 an einer der wichtigsten Gruppen mariner Bakterien.

Die häufig rötlich pigmentierten Mikroorganismen kommen in nahezu allen marinen Ökosystemen vor, in einigen davon bilden sie die vorherrschende Gruppe. Sie leben im Freiwasser und in den Sedimenten der Meere. Man findet sie auf biologischen und abiotischen Oberflächen, vergesellschaftet und in Symbiose mit anderen marinen Organismen wie z.B. Algen.

In den Stoffkreisläufen der Erde spielen sie eine bedeutende Rolle. Der außergewöhnlich vielseitige Stoffwechsel innerhalb der Roseobacter-Gruppe liefert darüber hinaus biotechnologisch hoch interessante Verbindungen.

Ein wesentliches Ziel der aktuellen Arbeiten ist es, die Durchsetzungsfähigkeit der Roseobacter-Arten vor dem evolutionären, genetischen und physiologischen Hintergrund zu verstehen.

Beteiligte Institutionen

Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg (Sprecherhochschule)
Technische Universität Braunschweig
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (HZI), Braunschweig
Leibniz-Institut DSMZ-Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH, Braunschweig
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

Laufzeit: 01.01.2010 - 31.12.2021 (3. Förderperiode)

Website

Teilprojektleiter Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Thomas Litt
Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology
Nussallee 8
53115 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Im SFB 806 werden die inter- und transkontinentale Ausbreitung des Modernen Menschen im jüngeren Quartär seit 190000 Jahren mit geo- und  kulturwissenschaftlichen Methoden untersucht. Besonderes Augenmerk liegt auf der Mobilität und Bevölkerungsdynamik in frühen menschlichen Gesellschaften, den regionalen Klimaverhältnissen, den Umweltfaktoren und dem gesellschaftlichen und kulturellen Kontext der Migrationsereignisse.
Regional konzentrieren sich die 21 Arbeitsgruppen auf zwei mögliche Ausbreitungsrouten des Modernen Menschen vom Ursprungsgebiet in Ostafrika: einmal nach Westen über die zentrale Sahara, die Straße von Gibraltar und die iberische Halbinsel und zum anderen nach Osten über den Vorderen Orient und den Balkan nach Zentraleuropa.
Der zeitliche Fokus der Projekte variiert je nach regionalem Schwerpunkt zwischen 190000 und 60000 Jahren vor heute in Afrika mit der Entstehung und dem ersten Exodus des Modernen Menschen bis zur Wiederbesiedlung Europas seit 18000 Jahren und der Ausbreitung von Ackerbau und Viehzucht.

Der SFB 806 ist ein Projekt des neuen Zent rums für Quartärforschung und Geoarchäologie an den Universitäten Köln, Bonn und der RWTH Aachen (www.qsga.de), das neuerdings auch Studenten der Archäologie und der Geowissenschaften in einem eigenen Masterstudiengang ausbildet. Gleichzeitig mit dem SFB wurde in Köln außerdem ein neues Datierungszentrum eingerichtet, das CologneAMS.

Beteiligte Institutionen:

  • Universität zu Köln (Sprecher-Hochschule)
  • Landschaftsverband Rheinland, Rheinisches Amt für Bodendenkmalpflege, Bonn
  • Neanderthal Museum, Mettmann
  • Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen

Laufzeit: seit 2009

Website

 


GRK

Research Training Groups (GRK) serve to promote young researchers. They are funded for a maximum of nine years.

The focus is on the qualification of doctoral students within the framework of a thematically focused research program and a structured qualification concept. An interdisciplinary orientation of the Research Training Groups is desired. The aim is to prepare doctoral students for the complex job market of "academia" and at the same time to support their early scientific independence.

Graduierte
© Volker Lannert/Uni Bonn

Research Training Groups at the University of Bonn

Site Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Arne Lützen
Kekulé-Institut für Organische Chemie und Biochemie
Gerhard-Domagk-Str. 1
53121 Bonn

Summary

Das Graduiertenkolleg ’Templierte organische Elektronik‘ (TIDE) setzt sich die umfassende DoktorandInnenausbildung im Bereich Organische Elektronik (OE) zum Ziel, um den Marktanforderungen an hochqualifiziertem und multidisziplinärem Fachpersonal gerecht zu werden. Weltweit hat die OE bereits die Elektronikwelt revolutioniert (z.B. OLEDs), jedoch ist der technologische Fortschritt überwiegend durch empirische Forschung entstanden, während grundlegende Prinzipien oftmals noch nicht vollständig verstanden sind. Die zentrale Fragestellung ist, wie strukturelle Ordnung die optoelektronischen Eigenschaften der pikonjugierten Materialien beeinflusst, und wie diese, u.a. durch gezielt eingesetzte Template, erhöht und damit die Bauteile verbessert werden können. Um die Breite des Forschungsthemas zu berücksichtigen, wurden fünf synergistische Schwerpunkte gebildet. Im Schwerpunkt A werden pikonjugierte molekulare Bausteine und in Schwerpunkt B oberflächenaktive Template synthetisiert. Im Schwerpunkt C werden Ober- & Grenzflächen mittels verschiedener Spektroskopien in Abhängigkeit von der Schichtdicke untersucht, um dann im Schwerpunkt D als aktive Materialien in optoelektronischen Bauteilen auf Ihre Eignung geprüft zu werden. Im Schwerpunkt E wird der Templatprozess theoretisch modelliert. Ein Team aus international anerkannten WissenschaftlerInnen bietet den beteiligten Promovierenden dabei ein einzigartiges Forschungsumfeld mit spannenden Projekten, welche auch einen Forschungsaufenthalt im Ausland vorsehen. Für das Qualifikationsprogramm ist die Bildung einer Kohorte vorgesehen. Die Fächer Chemie und Physik werden vertieft und materialwissenschaftlich ergänzt. Als zentrales Element dient die gemeinschaftliche Vorlesungsreihe aller Experten im TIDE Netzwerk sowie das zertifizierte Bench-to-Business (B2B) Programm, welches betriebswirtschaftliches Grundwissen vermittelt und den Übergang zwischen Grundlagenforschung an der Universität und angewandter Forschung im späteren Beruf befähigen soll. Unser multidisziplinärer Ansatz sowohl im Forschungs- als auch im Ausbildungsprogramm wird PromovendInnen hervorbringen, die sich nicht nur in ihrem jeweiligen Forschungsthema Expertenwissen angeeignet haben, sondern auch in benachbarten Disziplinen und marktwirtschaftlichen Aspekten. Unsere AbsolventInnen sind damit prädestinierte Promotoren (Vermittler zwischen verschiedenen Interessengruppen), um die zukünftigen Herausforderungen in der OE Industrie oder auf ähnlichen materialwissenschaftlichen Feldern zu meistern.

Participating Institution:

  • Universität zu Köln (Speaker-University)

Term

01.04.2021 - 30.09.2025 (1. Funding Period)

Website252525

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Johannes F. Lehmann
Institut für Germanistik, Vergleichbare Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft
Genscherallee 3
53113 Bonn

Summary

Academic research on contemporary literature is experiencing a boom. However, when asked to explain what constitutes contemporary literature, scholars commonly answer in terms of literary history, defining it as a certain period, e.g. as post-1945 literature. There is no basic reflection on ‘contemporary literature’ as a concept, neither in its historical nor in its praxeological dimensions.The aim of the proposed graduate school is to investigate the constitutive elements of the concept of ‘contemporary literature’ and to analyze them in a European and comparative perspective. Instead of taking such terms as ‘the present’, ‘contemporaneity’ and‘contemporary literature’ for granted, their historical contingency will be exposed and the conditions of their emergence will be examined. This also applies to the relationship established between literature and its respective ‘present’ or ‘contemporary age’: The discursive apparatuses that produce such relationships will be analyzed. Thus, the graduate school will reconstruct a history of producing, legitimizing, and transforming concepts of ‘contemporaneity’ and ‘the present’, thereby laying the groundwork for a theoretically and historically informed criticism of contemporary literature.

The graduate school will explore the concept of contemporary literature from four different vantage points:

Firstly, variant modes of conceiving of ‘the present’ or of ‘contemporaneity’ and their involvement with philosophical ideas of time as well as their medial and social settings will be examined.

Secondly, the semantics of the term ‘contemporary literature’ will be traced in its historical transformations, thereby taking into account diverse linguistic and cultural environments. This will shed light on the question of how (and since when) literary texts refer to contemporary issues and attain the status of ‘timeliness’.

Thirdly, the history of literary criticism will be analyzed: Since when and by which means have the institutions of criticism and academic research constructed the entity of ‘contemporary literature’?

Finally, attention will be drawn to the business and market dimension of literature. Practices of constructing ‘contemporary literature’ in the sphere of publishing, marketing, authorial self fashioning etc. will be put to the test.

In these four areas, the relevant topoi, tropes, practices and formalities will be discovered whose interplay constitutes what counts as ‘contemporary literature’ in divergent historical and cultural contexts.The graduate school will operate on the basis of a carefully crafted program of qualification and supervision. Particular stress will be laid on negotiating contacts to the practical sphere of the literary world, in order to qualify participants not only for academic careers but also for professions in the business of literature.

Term

01.10.2017 - 30.09.2026 (2. Fundingf Period)

Website26

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Christian Bayer
Institut für Makroökonomik und Ökonometrie
Adenauerallee 24-42
53113 Bonn

Summary

Economic inequality is a defining characteristic of our times. Most indicators of income and wealth concentration show a substantial widening of economic inequality in industrialized economies in recent decades, making inequality a highly debated political phenomenon and prompting some to diagnose a new “Gilded Age.” The macroeconomic implications of inequality remain poorly understood, however: does greater inequalityforce us to rethink existing macroeconomic models of aggregate fluctuations, for example? And what implications does inequality have for our theories of financial stability, and for monetary and fiscal policy? In its research program, the group’s first goal is to provide a solid empirical grounding through an in-depth analysis of the different dimensions of rising inequality that are relevant for macroeconomics. Based on this, the group’s second goal is to extend the profession’s understanding of how greater inequality changes the dynamic responses of the economy to macroeconomic shocks, and to what extent inequality creates new channels through which such shocks can propagate. A third important goal will be to analyze the linkages between inequality, debt, and financial fragility. In particular, we analyze if and how increasing inequality may make the economy more prone to “excessive” debt accumulation in the build-up of a financial crisis as well as how inequality matters for the recovery from such a crisis. All of this will enable us to address our fourth goal, namely, understanding what rising inequality implies for the design of macroeconomic policies, having in mind both their effectiveness for the aggregate and the policies’ distributional impacts. In pursuing these goals, the group will train researchers who will acquire the tools for pushing the boundaries of our understanding of one of the most pressing topics of our time, and who can pursue independent research above and beyond their time in the group. At the same time, they will acquire the knowledge needed to advise economic policy makers with respect to the macroeconomic consequences of inequality. To achieve these goals, the RTG will bring together a critical mass of internationally visible senior and junior researchers and doctoral students to study the macroeconomics of inequality in a group that has expertise in key aspects of the topic: the use of microeconomic data in macroeconomic analysis, the links between financial markets and the macroeconomy, and the study of business cycle models with heterogeneous agents.

Term: 

01.04.2018 - 30.09.2022 (1. Funding Period)

Website2723

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Christian Kurts
Institut für Experimentelle Immunologie
Venusberg Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Summary

Myeloid antigen presenting cells (APCs), i.e. dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, are key inducers and regulators of adaptive immune responses. They are essential in immunity to infection and vaccination but can also drive inappropriate immune responses that cause inflammatory disorders. However, many aspects of myeloid APC functions still remain poorly understood. Increasing the understanding of their function is therefore a current key topic in immunology. The members of this IRTG initiative have considerably advanced our knowledge of these cells and the adaptive immune processes they induce and regulate. Immunology is an internationally visible and strong research focus both in Bonn and Melbourne. Graduate students were centrally involved in many immunological discoveries, as evident by first and co-authorships in leading research journals, some of which resulted from previous student exchanges between these two locations. This IRTG proposal aims at a seamless continuation and expansion of these activities through the development of a joint PhD programme between Bonn and Melbourne, in which students work with eminent scientists at both locations. Areas of core expertise in Bonn include the role of local APCs in disease models, immune pattern sensing and transcriptional immune regulation. Melbourne is internationally recognized for excellence in research on T cells, NKT cells, DC subsets and for studying microbial infections. These areas are highly synergistic and, when combined, allow for much deeper scope and quality of research. The scientific exchange between Melbourne and Bonn will not only substantially improve research quality, but will create a highly conducive environment for the training of students. A typical PhD candidature will cover 3 years (2 years at home, 1 year abroad) and will be embedded in a coordinated training programme with supervisors at both locations. Students will be selected based on the quality of their application and achievements. PhD students that successfully complete this international programme will be highly competitive for international academic careers in both countries and industry.

Participating Institution: 

  • University of Melbourne, Australia

Term:

01.04.2016 - 31.03.2025 (2. Funding Period)

Website2827

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr. Alexander Pfeifer
Institute of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Biomedical Center
Venusberg-Campus 1
53127 Bonn

Summary

The RTG "Pharmacology of 7TM-receptors and downstream signaling pathways" studies the pharmacology of signaling pathways. The focus lies on seven-transmembrane receptors and downstream intracellular signaling pathways. The key scientific questions of the program are how signaling pathways are linked and how specificity of the cellular response is achieved as well as how signaling pathways can be modulated with (novel)drugs. New aspects of the second funding period include the analysis of neglected/not well studied 7TM receptors like orphan- und fatty acid receptors, new model systems including the lung and zebrafish as well as the study of immunological signaling pathways. For this purpose, the RTG offers state-of-the-art in vitro and in vivo assays, experimental tools and model systems. The high-profile researchers have expertise in solving important problems in the area of cell signaling and come from the Institutes of Pharmacology andToxicology, Pharmaceutical Biology und Medicinal/Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Physiology and Immunology. The scientific success of the RTG is reflected by 24 publications of PhD students (ten first and co-first author ships) in international leading journals including Nature, Nature Communications, and Journal of Clinical Investigation, as well as the active participation in national and international conferences during the first three years of funding.The RTG has created an outstanding qualification program that is oriented on an efficient exchange of knowledge. An important goal of the RTG is to foster independent and successful doctoral research as well as to prepare the young researchers for their future careers. An important feature of the program is the unique international program, which is based on cooperation with leading pharmacologists, a lecture series with international guest lecturers, international symposia. Most importantly, within the laboratory exchange program PhD students work on their projects in laboratories of our strategic partners for up to three months. Our strategic partners are graduate schools and departments of pharmacology of Vanderbilt University, the University of California San Diego, the University of Glasgow and the University of Tokyo. Moreover, to foster exchange between young pharmacologists in Germany, the RTG started - together with the German Society of Pharmacology - a series of "Pharmacology Summer Schools".

Term: 

01.10.2013 - 30.09.2022 (2. Funding Period)

Website30


Research Units

Research Units (Forschungsgruppen, FOR) serve the medium-term (up to eight years), close cooperation of several outstanding scientists on a specific research question. The aim is to achieve results that go far beyond individual funding and can only be achieved jointly. Research units can be located at a university or distributed locally. They often contribute to establishing new fields of research.

Forschungsgruppe 2733
© Albert Gerhards

Research Units at the University of Bonn

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Albert Gerhards (Emeritus)
Seminar für Liturgiewissenschaft
Katholisch-Theologische Fakultät
Am Hof 1
53113 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Zunehmend werden Kirchen verkauft, umgenutzt oder abgerissen, obwohl die Akzeptanz von Kirchengebäuden und das Festhalten an ihnen weitaus verbreiteter sind, als es die gegenwärtigen Schrumpfungsprozesse in den Kirchen erwarten lassen. Im Alltag empfinden auch nicht religiös geprägte Menschen sakrale Räume als wertvoll, diese bieten somit auch der breiteren Bevölkerung eine Möglichkeit der Orientierung und Identifikation. Der mit dem Rückbau der Kirchen einhergehende Transformationsprozess verläuft dabei überwiegend unstrukturiert. Hier ansetzend, will die Forschungsgruppe durch die Zusammenführung unterschiedlicher Forschungsansätze eine praxisrelevante Theorie des sakralen Raumes im 21. Jahrhundert erarbeiten.

Beteiligte Institutionen

  • Universität zu Köln
  • Universität Leipzig
  • Universität Regensburg
  • Universität Wuppertal

Laufzeit: bewilligt September 2019, Start März 2020

Website

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Jörg Höhfeld
Institut für Zellbiologie
Ulrich-Haberland-Str. 61a
53121 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Die Aufrechterhaltung funktioneller Proteinnetzwerke selbst unter Bedingungen, die Proteinstrukturen destabilisieren, ist eine notwendige Voraussetzung für das Überleben von Zellen und die Erhaltung von Geweben und Organismen. Die Anpassung und Regulation von Proteinfaltungs- und Proteinabbau-Systemen stellen dabei wesentliche Schutzmechanismen dar. Durch vermehrte Rückfaltung bzw. die Entsorgung beschädigter Proteine tragen diese Systeme entscheidend zur Protein-Homöostase unter Stressbedingungen bei. In vielzelligen Organismen sind Zellen permanent einer Belastung durch mechanische Kräfte ausgesetzt und benötigen darauf abzielende Schutzmechanismen. Diese Mechanismen operieren während der Differenzierung, der Adhäsion und der Migration von Zellen und sind von herausragender Bedeutung für die Aufrechterhaltung von Geweben wie der Skelettmuskulatur, dem Herzen, der Lunge, der Niere, der Haut und den Blutgefäßen. Dennoch wurden zugrundeliegende molekulare Mechanismen bislang nur unzureichend untersucht. Im Rahmen der Forschungsgruppe sollen deshalb Mechanobiologie und Zellbiologie, Nieren-, Muskel- und Sportphysiologie sowie molekulare Immunologie und Wurm- und Maus-Genetik in einem innovativen interdisziplinären Verbund vereint werden, um hier neue Einblicke zu ermöglichen. Mittels modernster Methodik werden isolierte Zellen und Gewebe, genetisch veränderbare Modellorganismen und humane Probanden definierten mechanischen Belastungen ausgesetzt werden und hinsichtlich induzierter Anpassungen von Proteinfaltungs- und Abbaumaschinerien untersucht werden. Dies wird es ermöglichen, Chaperon- und Protease-Systeme zu identifizieren, die mechanisch beschädigte Proteine erkennen und prozessieren, und die Regulation dieser Systeme unter mechanischem Stress zu analysieren. Basierend auf der Untersuchung verschiedener Zelltypen und Gewebe sollen sowohl allgemeine als auch spezifische Mechanismen zur Bewältigung von mechanischem Stress aufgedeckt werden. Die Forschungsgruppe schließt damit auf nationaler und auch internationaler Ebene eine wesentliche Lücke zwischen der Erforschung Kraft-generierender, -widerstehender und -übertragender Strukturen im Rahmen der Mechanobiologie und der Analyse von Stressantworten innerhalb der Proteostase-Forschung, welche sich bislang fast ausschließlich auf Hitzestress sowie oxidativen und proteotoxischen Stress konzentriert hat. Die Forschungsgruppe wird fundamentale Prinzipien der mechanischen Stressbewältigung etablieren und die Relevanz dieser Vorgänge im Hinblick auf humane Erkrankungen wie Muskelschwächen, Störungen des Immunsystems und Nierenerkrankungen aufzeigen.

Beteiligte Institutionen:

  • Universität Freiburg
  • Universität zu Köln
  • Deutsche Sporthochschule Köln
  • Forschungszentrum Jülich
  • International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Warschau (Polen)

Laufzeit: seit 2018

Website

Sprecherin

Prof. Dr. Cornelia Richter
Evangelisch-Theologische Fakultät
Abt. für Systematische Theologie und Hermeneutik
Am Hof 1
53113 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Die Fähigkeit, schwierige Lebenssituationen ohne anhaltende Beeinträchtigung zu überstehen, nennen Psychologen Resilienz. Die Forschungsgruppe will den Begriff im Verhältnis zur religiösen und spirituellen Dimension menschlichen Lebens untersuchen. Die Forscherinnen und Forscher wollen so die bisher üblichen Resilienzfaktoren wie Selbstwahrnehmung, Selbstwirksamkeit, Selbstregulation und -steuerung oder die Fähigkeit zur Konfliktlösung durch weitere Faktoren ergänzen und den Resilienzbegriff damit präzisieren.

Beteiligte Institutionen

  • Universität zu Köln
  • Universität Rostock
  • LMU München
  • Universität Zürich

Laufzeit: bewilligt 2019

Website

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Martin Sander
Steinmann-Institut für Geologie, Mineralogie und Paläontologie
Nussallee 8
53115 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Wie werden aus Organismen Fossilien? Mit dieser Frage befasst sich die neue Forschergruppe „Die Grenzen des Fossilberichtes: Analytische und experimentelle Ansätze zum Verständnis der Fossilisation“, die von der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft in den nächsten drei Jahren mit rund 2,5 Millionen Euro gefördert wird. Dabei sollen modernste Analytik unter anderem aus der Chemie und Pharmazie zum Einsatz kommen.

Obwohl der Fossilbericht die Hauptquelle für die Geschichte des Lebens auf der Erde ist, bleibt das Verständnis der materiellen Natur der Fossilien bislang lückenhaft. „Wir wissen nicht, was fossiler Knochen wirklich ist – anscheinend nicht nur `Stein´, sondern auch alle möglichen organischen Reste“, sagt der Sprecher der neuen Forschergruppe, Prof. Dr. Martin Sander vom Steinmann-Institut der Universität Bonn. Was aus Forschersicht bislang auch nicht ausreichend untersucht ist, wie zum Beispiel Haut, Dinosauriereier oder in seltenen Fällen sogar Muskeln „versteinern“ können.

Ziel der Forschergruppe ist es, neueste Technologien der Bildgebung und Analyse auf Fossilien von Pflanzen sowie Weichkörperreste von Arthropoden und Wirbeltieren anzuwenden, um den Prozess der Fossilisation besser zu verstehen. Mit modernster Analytik aus der organischen Chemie und der Pharmazie – darunter Massenspektrometrie und Ramanspektroskopie – wollen die Wissenschaftler Licht ins Dunkel bringen.

Neben dem Steinmann-Institut sind das Kekulé-Institut für Organische Chemie, das Pharmazeutische Institut und das Institut für Mikrobiologie der Universität Bonn sowie auch Arbeitsgruppen der Universität Mainz beteiligt.

Beteiligte Institutionen:

  • Universität Mainz
  • Hessisches Landesmuseum Darmstadt

Laufzeit: seit 01.01.2018

website

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Kusche
Institut für Geodäsie und Geoinformation
Nussallee 17
53115 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

The primary goals are:
(1) develop a multi-observation ensemble-based calibration and data assimilation (C/DA) methodology to combine observational data of model output variables (time series of gauge-based streamflow, GRACE/GRACE-FO total water storage variations, remotely-sensed extent and level of surface water bodies, snow cover, glacier mass change and streamflow) with hydrological models in an optimal manner.
(2) exploit this methodology with the global hydrological model WaterGAP to provide an improved quantitative assessment of freshwater fluxes and storages including their uncertainties in response to climate and anthropogenic forcing.

Beteiligte Institutionen:

  • Goethe Universität Frankfurt
  • TUM
  • Universität Stuttgart
  • DLR Oberpfaffenhofen
  • GFZ Potsdam
  • HafenCity Universität Hamburg
  • University of St. Andrews
  • Université du Luxembourg

Laufzeit: seit 2018

Website

Sprecherin

PD Dr. Silke Trömel
Institut für Geowissenschaften und Meteorologie
Auf dem Hügel 20
53121 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Die Forschungsgruppe will die Prognose von Niederschlägen verbessern. Dazu greifen die Forscherinnen und Forscher aus Meteorologie, Atmosphärenforschung und Hydrologie auf Daten zurück, die erst seit wenigen Jahren verfügbar sind. So sollen Kürzestfrist- und mittelfristige Niederschlagsvorhersagen sowie lokale Hochwasservorhersagen besser getroffen werden. 

Beteiligte Institutionen:

  • Universität Augsburg
  • Freie Universität Berlin
  • Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)
  • Forschungszentrum Jülich
  • Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD)

Laufzeit: seit 2018

Website

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Juergen Gall
Institute of Computer Science
Computer Vision Group
Endenicher Allee 19a
53115 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

In the last years, we have seen a tremendous progress in the capabilities of computer systems to classify image or video clips taken from the Internet or to analyze human pose in real-time for gaming applications. These systems, however, analyze the past or in the case of real-time systems the present with a delay of a few milliseconds. For applications, where a moving system has to react or interact with humans, this is insufficient. For instance, robots collaborating with humans need not only to perceive the current situation, but they need to anticipate human actions and the resulting future situations in order to plan their own actions.

In this project, we aim to develop the technology that lays the foundation for applications that require the anticipation of human behavior. Instead of addressing the problem at a limited scope, the project addresses all relevant aspects including time horizons ranging from milliseconds to infinity and granularity ranging from detailed human motion to coarse action labels. To ensure that the developed methods are not limited to a single task but can be applied for a large variety of applications, we do not solve sub-problems in isolation but address the aspects jointly.

As a scenario for an application, we focus on service robots that support impaired or elderly people at home. Due to the demographic change, the population structure in Germany will change dramatically.
Service robots can fill the gap, but they need the ability to anticipate human behavior at various levels of granularity in order to be accepted and be efficient. The robot needs to know when its help is needed, but it should not stand in the way. In a collaborative setting, the robot is expected to complete tasks together with a human. This requires to anticipate both the intention but also detailed movements, e.g., when jointly carrying an object. Another important aspect in this context is the prevention of accidents. This is in particular very important for elderly people. Predicting accidents before they happen would allow to support the humans in time. This can happen by a signal to warn the human if the human can still prevent the accident without additional help, but also by an immediate support of a service robot.

Beteiligte Institution:

  • Leibniz Universität Hannover

Laufzeit: seit 01.06.2017

Website25

Sprecherin

Prof. Dr. Evi Kostenis
Institut für Pharmazeutische Biologie
Nussallee 6
53115 Bonn

Zusammenfassung

Heterotrimere αβγ G-Proteine sind an der Innenseite der Plasmamembran lokalisiert und spielen eine Schlüsselrolle in der Kommunikation jeder Körperzelle mit ihrer Umgebung. Ihre Entdeckung wurde im Jahre 1994 mit dem Nobelpreis für Medizin ausgezeichnet. Stimuliert werden G-Proteine durch G-Protein-gekoppelte Rezeptoren (GPCR), eine Proteinfamilie, die extrazelluläre Signale empfängt und in Konformationsänderungen umsetzt, die von G-Proteinen „dekodiert“ und als Botschaft in das Zellinnere weitergegeben werden. Auf diese Weise vermitteln GPCR und ihre assoziierten G-Proteine eine Vielzahl physiologischer Effekte wie z.B. Regulation des Blutdrucks, des Tonus der Atemwege, aber auch Zellbewegung, Metabolismus und Zellproliferation. Die enorme physiologische Relevanz von GPCR spiegelt sich darin wieder, dass etwa ein Drittel aller Arzneimittel ihre Wirkung über diese Rezeptorfamilie entfaltet. Auch der im Jahre 2012 verliehene Nobelpreis für Chemie, für bahnbrechende Erkenntnisse zu Struktur und Funktion von GPCR, reflektiert das therapeutische Potential dieser Signalgeber.

Der enorme Fortschritt im Verständnis von Bau und Funktion von GPCR veranlasste unsere Forschergruppe den konsequenten nächsten Schritt ins Zellinnere zu gehen: Fokussierung auf G-Proteine als Botschafter zur Weiterleitung des GPCR-Stimulus in die Zelle. Unser Konsortium konzentriert sich daher auf zwei Forschungsansätze:

Die Rolle von G-Proteinen in (patho)physiologischen Geschehen besser zu verstehen und
G-Proteine als neuer Ansatzort für therapeutische Intervention.
Unsere multidisziplinäre Forschergemeinschaft hat den rationalen Entwurf und die Herstellung neuer, zellpermeabler Signalwegsinhibitoren zum Ziel, die in spezifischer Weise G-Protein Familien ausschalten. Hierfür bedienen wir uns komplementärer chemischer und biologischer Ansätze wie chemische Synthese, ausgehend von vorhandenen Leitstrukturen, kombinatorische Peptidsynthese und kombinatorische Bio- sowie Mutasynthese. Molekular-mechanistische Analysen und die Charakterisierung der Wirkungsweisen gefolgt von einer Targetstruktur-basierten rationalen Optimierung sollen uns erlauben, diejenigen Inhibitoren zu identifizieren, die in zellbasierten in vitro und ex vivo/in vivo Modellen eingesetzt werden können. Von dieser Vorgehensweise versprechen wir uns neue Einsichten zu G-Protein gesteuerten Signalkaskaden in komplexen Signalnetzwerken unter (patho)physio-logischen Prozessen.

Beteiligte Institutionen:

  • Universität Frankfurt/Main
  • Universität Magdeburg
  • Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Schweiz

Laufzeit: seit 2016

Website

Priority Programs

A characteristic of a Priority Program (Schwerpunktprogramm) is the supraregional cooperation of the participating scientists. As a rule, it is funded for a period of six years. In order to participate in a Priority Programme, the DFG invites interested researchers to submit a proposal by a specific deadline.

Priority Programs are intended to provide tangible impetus for the advancement of science through the coordinated, locally distributed funding of relevant and innovative topics:

  • Funding projects with high originality and quality in subject matter and/or methodology ("emerging fields").
  • Added value through cross-disciplinary collaboration (interdisciplinarity)
  • Added value through cross-location collaboration (networking)
Silke Trömel
© Silke Trömel

Priority Programs at the University of Bonn

Koordinatorin

PD Dr. Silke Trömel
Institute for Geosciences and Meteorology, University Bonn
Auf dem Hügel 20
53121 Bonn

Abstract

Cloud and precipitation processes are the main source of uncertainties in weather prediction and climate change projections since decades. A major part of these uncertainties can be attributed to missing observations suitable to challenge the representation of cloud and precipitation processes in atmospheric models. The whole atmosphere over Germany is since recently monitored by 17 state-of-the-art polarimetric Doppler weather radars, which provide every five minutes 3D information on the liquid and frozen precipitating particles and their movements on a sub-kilometer resolution, which is also approached by the atmospheric models for weather prediction and climate studies. Data assimilation merges observations and models for state estimation as a requisite for prediction and can be considered as a smart interpolation between observations while exploiting the physical consistency of atmospheric models as mathematical constraints. However, considerable knowledge gaps exist both in radar polarimetry and atmospheric models, which impede the full exploitation of the triangle radar polarimetry – atmospheric models – data assimilation and call for a coordinated interdisciplinary effort. The priority programme will exploit the synergy of the new observations and state-of-the-art atmospheric models to better understand moist processes in the atmosphere, and to improve their representation in climate- and weather prediction models. The programme will extend our scientific understanding at the verges of the three disciplines for better predictions of precipitating cloud systems

Laufzeit: seit 2018

Website


Your point of contact in Research and Innovation Services

Avatar Hahlen

Dr. Katrin Hahlen

Dipl. Biol.

0.005

Poppelsdorfer Allee 47

53115 Bonn

+49 228 73-60917

Avatar Häger

Dr. Hanna Häger

M.A.

0.005

Poppelsdorfer Allee 47

53115 Bonn

+49 228 73-54181

Are you interested in submitting an application with the DFB?

Wird geladen