Researching for the future

Clusters of Excellence

The University of Bonn is one of the leading research universities in Germany and also enjoys an excellent reputation worldwide. This can be seen by the funding provided to date under the Excellence Initiative by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) and German Council of Science and Humanities (Wissenschaftsrat). In 2006, the University of Bonn was awarded two Clusters of Excellence and two Graduate Schools. Since January 2019, the University of Bonn has six Clusters of Excellence, more than any other university in Germany.

HCM
© Barbara Frommann/HCM

Hausdorff Center for Mathematics

The research of the Hausdorff Center for Mathematics (HCM) ranges from pure and applied mathematics to mathematically orientated research in economics as well as interdisciplinary work.

ImmunoSensation2
© ImmunoSensation

ImmunoSensation2

The ultimate goal of ImmunoSensation2 is to decipher the principles that govern the global functionality of the immune system in healthy and diseased states.

Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies logo
© Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies

Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies

With the key concept of "Strong Asymmetrical Dependency" the Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies (BCDSS) opens up a new perspective on slavery and dependency research.

PhenoRob
© PhenoRob

PhenoRob

PhenoRob, the only Cluster of Excellence in Germany in agricultural sciences, brings together researchers from different disciplines to investigate how technology can enable sustainable crop production.

EconTribute
© Marc Thürbach

ECONtribute: Markets and Public Policy

Research at ECONtribute focuses on markets at the interface between economics, politics and society aiming to advance a new paradigm for the analysis of market failure.

ML4Q
© ML4Q

Matter and light for quantum computing 

The aim of the Matter and Light for Quantum Computing (ML4Q) Cluster is to develop new computing and networking architectures using the principles of quantum mechanics.

Latest News from our Clusters
Spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Ethiopia is underestimated

In an Ethiopian-German research collaboration, researchers of the Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine at the LMU University Hospital with participation of the University of Bonn investigated blood samples of frontline healthcare workers and residents from urban and rural communities for antibodies. The results suggest that the true COVID-19 prevalence is much higher than previously reported official figures. Therefore, the research team recommends a realignment of the vaccination strategy for Africa. The study is published in the journal “The Lancet Global Health”.

Epigenetics: Immunization is passed on to offspring

Does an infection also affect the immunization of subsequent generations? Researchers at Radboud University (Netherlands) have studied this together with the Universities of Bonn, Saarland (Germany), Lausanne (Switzerland) and Athens (Greece). Mouse fathers who had previously overcome an infection with fungi or were stimulated with fungal compounds also passed on their improved protection to their offspring across several generations. The team showed at the same time an improved immune response being passed on to the descendants. The study has now been published in the renowned journal Nature Immunology. 

University of Bonn recruits top-class researchers

Renowned reinforcement for the University of Bonn: With the first "High profile" professorships financed by excellence funds, three top-class scientific personalities join the University of Excellence to open up new fields of research and to provide important impulses in various disciplines. Ethicist Prof. Dr. Christiane Woopen takes up a so-called Hertz Professorship today (October 1), while agricultural economist Prof. Dr. Matin Qaim and Catholic theologian Prof. Dr. Klaus von Stosch fill so-called Schlegel Professorships. The three professors were officially appointed at a reception in the Rector's Office.

Immune cells in the brain share the work

To break down toxic proteins more quickly, immune cells in the brain can join together to form networks when needed. This is shown by a joint study of the University of Bonn, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the Institut François Jacob in France. However, in certain mutations that can cause Parkinson's disease, this cooperation is impaired. The findings are published in the renowned journal Cell.

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