Clusters of Excellence

The University of Bonn is one of the leading research universities in Germany and also enjoys an excellent reputation worldwide. This can be seen by the funding provided to date under the Excellence Initiative by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) and German Council of Science and Humanities (Wissenschaftsrat). In 2006, the University of Bonn was awarded two Clusters of Excellence and two Graduate Schools. Since January 2019, the University of Bonn has six Clusters of Excellence, more than any other university in Germany.

HCM
© Barbara Frommann/HCM

Hausdorff Center for Mathematics

The research of the Hausdorff Center for Mathematics (HCM) ranges from pure and applied mathematics to mathematically orientated research in economics as well as interdisciplinary work.

ImmunoSensation2
© ImmunoSensation

ImmunoSensation2

The ultimate goal of ImmunoSensation2 is to decipher the principles that govern the global functionality of the immune system in healthy and diseased states.

Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies logo
© Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies

Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies

With the key concept of "Strong Asymmetrical Dependency" the Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies (BCDSS) opens up a new perspective on slavery and dependency research.

PhenoRob
© Volker Lannert/Uni Bonn

PhenoRob

PhenoRob, the only Cluster of Excellence in Germany in agricultural sciences, brings together researchers from different disciplines to investigate how technology can enable sustainable crop production.

EconTribute
© Marc Thürbach

ECONtribute: Markets and Public Policy

Research at ECONtribute focuses on markets at the interface between economics, politics and society aiming to advance a new paradigm for the analysis of market failure.

ML4Q
© ML4Q

Matter and light for quantum computing 

The aim of the Matter and Light for Quantum Computing (ML4Q) Cluster is to develop new computing and networking architectures using the principles of quantum mechanics.

Latest News from our Clusters
Meat import ban in Africa hurts local population

The EU regularly exports large quantities of poultry meat to West African countries. These exports have been criticized for harming importing countries in West Africa and exacerbating poverty there. The reason: Cheap imports depress the local price of chicken, making life difficult for local smallholders. Researchers at the Universities of Bonn and Göttingen have now used the example of Ghana to calculate the effects that would result if the country were to significantly increase its import tariffs for poultry meat or even stop imports completely. The result: Prices would indeed rise domestically, but most local households would not benefit. The study has been published in the journal Food Security.

Physical effect also valid in the quantum world

Physicists at the University of Bonn have experimentally proven that an important theorem of statistical physics applies to so-called "Bose-Einstein condensates." Their results now make it possible to measure certain properties of the quantum “superparticles” and deduce system characteristics that would otherwise be difficult to observe. The study has now been published in Physical Review Letters.

How nerve and vascular cells coordinate their growth

Nerve cells need a lot of energy and oxygen. They receive both through the blood. This is why nerve tissue is usually crisscrossed by a large number of blood vessels. But what prevents neurons and vascular cells from getting in each other's way as they grow? Researchers at the Universities of Heidelberg and Bonn, together with international partners, have identified a mechanism that takes care of this. The results have now appeared in the journal Neuron. 

Cleft lip and palate: News from the genes

Cleft lip and palate are among the most common congenital malformations, which are mainly due to genetic causes. It is not yet known exactly which genes are affected. A study led by the University of Bonn has now uncovered new correlations: New mutations near known genes such as SPRY1 could contribute to the increase in disease risk. There is also evidence that the transcription factor Musculin is causally involved. The results have now been published online in advance in the journal Human Genetics and Genomics Advances. The final version will follow soon.

Wird geladen